Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 897578, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/897578
Review Article

Development of Ecosystem Research

1Department of Botany, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia
2Department of Botany, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
3Department of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
4Kearney Foundation of Mineral Nutrition, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
5Agriculture and Forestry Departments, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, UK

Received 15 January 2011; Accepted 10 February 2011

Academic Editor: D. Pimentel

Copyright © 2011 Raymond Louis Specht. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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