Table of Contents
ISRN Allergy
Volume 2011, Article ID 950104, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/950104
Research Article

The Characterization of the Repertoire of Wheat Antigens and Peptides Involved in the Humoral Immune Responses in Patients with Gluten Sensitivity and Crohn's Disease

Immunosciences Laboratory, Inc., 822 S. Robertson Boulevard, Suite 312, Los Angeles, CA 90035, USA

Received 20 July 2011; Accepted 21 August 2011

Academic Editors: B. M. Stadler and P. E. Taylor

Copyright © 2011 Aristo Vojdani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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