Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2011, Article ID 953818, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/953818
Review Article

Physical Activity in the Prevention and Treatment of Stroke

1School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G11 6NT, UK
3Department of Physiotherapy, Western Infirmary, Glasgow G11 6NT, UK

Received 2 July 2011; Accepted 4 August 2011

Academic Editors: W. D. Byblow, A. Lagares, R. L. Macdonald, and Y. Shinohara

Copyright © 2011 Siobhan Gallanagh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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