Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 961807, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/961807
Research Article

Heathland Restoration Techniques: Ecological Consequences for Plant-Soil and Plant-Animal Interactions

School of Applied Sciences, Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus, Fern-Barrow, Poole, Dorset BH12 5BB, UK

Received 9 August 2011; Accepted 15 September 2011

Academic Editors: C. Geron and C. F. J. Meyer

Copyright © 2011 Anita Diaz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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