Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 981096, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/981096
Research Article

Barriers to Emergency Obstetric Care Services in Perinatal Deaths in Rural Gambia: A Qualitative In-Depth Interview Study

1Section for International Health, Department of General Practice and Community of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, P.O. BOX 1130, Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway
2Reproductive and Child Health Programme, Ministry of State for Health and Social Welfare, Banjul, Gambia
3National Resource Centre for Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks 4950, 0424 Oslo, Norway

Received 11 April 2011; Accepted 7 May 2011

Academic Editor: I. Diez-Itza

Copyright © 2011 Abdou Jammeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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