Table of Contents
ISRN Gastroenterology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 141548, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/141548
Research Article

Effect of Echium amoenum Fisch. et Mey a Traditional Iranian Herbal Remedy in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis

1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 8146-73461, Iran
2Department of Pharmacognosy and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 8146-73461, Iran
3Department of Clinical Pathology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 8146-73461, Iran
4Islamic Azad University, Qazvin Branch, Qazvin 8146-73461, Iran

Received 29 July 2012; Accepted 14 August 2012

Academic Editors: G. Barbaro and A. Nakajima

Copyright © 2012 Alireza Abed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Acute pancreatitis is a morbid inflammatory condition of pancreas with limited specific therapy. Enhanced oxidative stress plays an important role in induction and progression of acute pancreatitis. So reducing oxidative stress may relieve this pathogenic process. Echium amoenum Fisch. and Mey has been implemented in Iranian folk medicine for several centuries. Antioxidant, analgesic, immunomodulatory, and anxiolytic properties of E. amoenum suggest that this plant may have beneficial effects in the management of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of petals of E. amoenum extract (EAE) on a murine model of pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) with 1h intervals which was characterized by pancreatic inflammation and increase in the serum level of digestive enzymes, in comparison to normal mice. EAE (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) was administered i.p., 30 minutes before induction of pancreatitis. Pretreatment with EAE (400 mg/kg) reduced significantly the inflammatory response of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by ameliorating pancreatic edema, amylase and lipase serum levels, proinflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, lipid peroxidation and pathological alteration. These results show that EAE attenuates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis with an anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antioxidant effects.