Table of Contents
ISRN Agronomy
Volume 2012, Article ID 145072, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/145072
Research Article

Growth and Physiological Responses of Maize and Sorghum Genotypes to Salt Stress

1Texas AgriLife Research, The Texas A&M University System, 1380 A&M Circle, El Paso, TX 79927, USA
2Texas AgriLife Research, The Texas A&M University System, 1102 East FM 1294, Lubbock, TX 79403, USA

Received 27 August 2012; Accepted 11 September 2012

Academic Editors: W. P. Williams and L. Zeng

Copyright © 2012 Genhua Niu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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