Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2012, Article ID 154971, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/154971
Research Article

Seroprevalence of Fowl Pox Antibody in Indigenous Chickens in Jos North and South Council Areas of Plateau State, Nigeria: Implication for Vector Vaccine

1Viral Research Department, National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom Nigeria, Nigeria
2Department of Medicine, The John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

Received 30 June 2012; Accepted 26 August 2012

Academic Editors: M. H. Kogut and S. Whisnant

Copyright © 2012 Meseko Clement Adebajo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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