Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2012, Article ID 185461, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/185461
Research Article

Urine from Sexually Mature Intact Male Mice Contributes to Increased Cardiovascular Responses during Free-Roaming and Restrained Conditions

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, College of Medicine, Howard University, 520 W Street NW, Washington, DC 20059, USA

Received 12 December 2011; Accepted 10 January 2012

Academic Editor: Z. Grabarevic

Copyright © 2012 Dexter L. Lee and Justin L. Wilson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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