Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 197356, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/197356
Research Article

Swift Foxes and Ideal Free Distribution: Relative Influence of Vegetation and Rodent Prey Base on Swift Fox Survival, Density, and Home Range Size

1Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA
2Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Fresno, CA 93710, USA
3National Wildlife Research Center, Wildlife Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Logan, UT 84322, USA

Received 23 April 2012; Accepted 16 May 2012

Academic Editors: A. Arslan and A. Ramirez-Bautista

Copyright © 2012 Craig M. Thompson and Eric M. Gese. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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