Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 203796, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/203796
Research Article

Scoping a Public Health Impact Assessment of Aquaculture with Particular Reference to Tilapia in the UK

1Occupational and Environmental Health Research Group, Centre for Public Health and Population Health Research, University of Stirling, Scotland, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
2Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling, Scotland, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
3Stirling Management School, University of Stirling, Scotland, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
4Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Scotland, Glasgow G12 9LX, UK
5Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4

Received 19 October 2011; Accepted 30 November 2011

Academic Editor: C. Banwell

Copyright © 2012 Andrew Watterson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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