Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2012, Article ID 241967, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/241967
Clinical Study

Acute, Repeated Exposure to Mobile Phone Noise and Audiometric Status of Young Adult Users in a University Community

1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
2Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
3New Jersey Safe Schools Program, Center for School and Community-Based Research and Education, School of Public Health, UMDNJ, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-2688, USA
4Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ and Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
5Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria

Received 6 August 2012; Accepted 26 August 2012

Academic Editors: M. Askarian and O. Zurriaga

Copyright © 2012 Godson R. E. E. Ana et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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