Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 246142, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/246142
Research Article

Vacant Properties and Violence in Neighborhoods

1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
2Division of General Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Received 24 August 2012; Accepted 10 September 2012

Academic Editors: R. E. Fullilove, C. Rissel, and M. H. Stigler

Copyright © 2012 Charles C. Branas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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