Table of Contents
ISRN Forestry
Volume 2012, Article ID 271549, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/271549
Research Article

Geographic Patterns and Stand Variables Influencing Growth and Vigor of Populus tremuloides in the Sierra Nevada (USA)

Department of Forestry and Wildland Resources, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst Street, Arcata, CA 95521, USA

Received 2 October 2012; Accepted 20 October 2012

Academic Editors: G. Martinez Pastur and H. Zeng

Copyright © 2012 John-Pascal Berrill and Christa M. Dagley. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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