Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2012, Article ID 274510, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/274510
Review Article

Self-Organizing Processes in Landscape Pattern and Resilience: A Review

Biology Department, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA

Received 27 August 2012; Accepted 24 October 2012

Academic Editors: S. C. Dekker, H. Sanderson, and C. J. Topping

Copyright © 2012 Donald L. DeAngelis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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