Table of Contents
ISRN Dentistry
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 350859, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/350859
Review Article

Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbria-Induced Expression of Inflammatory Cytokines and Cyclooxygenase-2 in Mouse Macrophages and Its Inhibition by the Bioactive Compounds Fibronectin and Melatonin

Division of Oral Diagnosis, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Sciences, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado-City, Saitama 350-0283, Japan

Received 6 January 2012; Accepted 29 January 2012

Academic Editors: M. I. Ryder and S. E. Widmalm

Copyright © 2012 Yukio Murakami et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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