Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2012, Article ID 360379, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/360379
Research Article

Effect of Chronic L-Dopa or Melatonin Treatments after Dopamine Deafferentation in Rats: Dyskinesia, Motor Performance, and Cytological Analysis

Laboratorio de Neuromorfologia, Departamento de Neurociencias, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, UNAM, Avenida de los Barrios 1, Los Reyes Iztacala, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico

Received 5 September 2011; Accepted 20 October 2011

Academic Editors: B. Drukarch and A. K. Petridis

Copyright © 2012 Ana Luisa Gutierrez-Valdez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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