Table of Contents
ISRN Ophthalmology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 378641, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/378641
Research Article

Distribution of Nidogen in the Murine Eye and Ocular Phenotype of the Nidogen-1 Knockout Mouse

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany

Received 4 May 2012; Accepted 3 July 2012

Academic Editors: G. Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, A. V. Ljubimov, L. Pierro, and M. Sugimoto

Copyright © 2012 Christian Albrecht May. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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