Table of Contents
ISRN Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 392647, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/392647
Review Article

The Stemness Phenotype Model

1Department of Clinical Neuroscience R54, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
2Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
3Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica, Chile
4Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

Received 26 April 2012; Accepted 23 May 2012

Academic Editors: H. Rizos and G. Schiavon

Copyright © 2012 M. H. Cruz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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