Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 427267, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/427267
Review Article

Beyond Dopamine: Glutamate as a Target for Future Antipsychotics

1Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London SE5 8AF, UK
2North East London NHS Foundation Trust, Ilford IG3 8XJ, UK
3Cognition, Schizophrenia and Imaging Laboratory, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London SE5 8AF, UK
4Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Princess Royal University Hospital, Orpington BR6 8NY, UK

Received 29 April 2012; Accepted 6 June 2012

Academic Editors: R. Fantozzi, H. Y. Lane, P. Olinga, and K. Tamura

Copyright © 2012 Kyra-Verena Sendt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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