Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 571803, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/571803
Review Article

Individual, Social, Economic, and Environmental Model: A Paradigm Shift for Obesity Prevention

1Analytical Services Branch, Australian Bureau of Statistics Locked Bag 10, Belconnen, Canberra, ACT 2616, Australia
2Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6108, Morgantown, WV 26505-6108, USA

Received 15 October 2012; Accepted 31 October 2012

Academic Editors: B. van Wijngaarden and B. Vicente

Copyright © 2012 Anura Amarasinghe and Gerard D'Souza. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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