Table of Contents
ISRN Psychiatry
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 589792, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/589792
Research Article

Toward a Theory of Childhood Learning Disorders, Hyperactivity, and Aggression

School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, 350 West Woodrow Wilson Drive, Room 229, Jackson, MS 39213, USA

Received 4 April 2012; Accepted 14 June 2012

Academic Editors: D. W. S. Chung and C. M. Contreras

Copyright © 2012 Anthony R. Mawson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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