Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2012, Article ID 593103, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/593103
Research Article

Silviculture and Wildlife: Snowshoe Hare Abundance across a Successional Sequence of Natural and Intensively Managed Forests

1Department of Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, The University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
2Applied Mammal Research Institute, 11010 Mitchell Avenue, Summerland, BC, Canada V0H 1Z8

Received 20 January 2012; Accepted 7 February 2012

Academic Editors: P. Borges and T. Nagaike

Copyright © 2012 Thomas P. Sullivan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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