Table of Contents
ISRN Analytical Chemistry
Volume 2012, Article ID 604389, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/604389
Research Article

Sol-Gel Thin Films Immobilized with Bromocresol Purple pH-Sensitive Indicator in Presence of Surfactants

1Department of Chemistry, The Islamic University of Gaza, P.O. Box 108, Gaza, Palestine
2Department of Chemistry, Al-Azhar University, P.O. Box 1277, Gaza, Palestine
3Department of Physics, The Islamic University of Gaza, P.O. Box 108, Gaza, Palestine

Received 11 November 2011; Accepted 7 December 2011

Academic Editors: N. Chaniotakis, I. Djerdj, and J. Zieba-Palus

Copyright © 2012 Nizam M. El-Ashgar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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