Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2012, Article ID 613595, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/613595
Clinical Study

Brain Activation in Primary Motor and Somatosensory Cortices during Motor Imagery Correlates with Motor Imagery Ability in Stroke Patients

1Department of Human Science “Riccardo Massa”, Centre for Studies in Communication Sciences (CESCOM), University of Milan-Bicocca, 20162 Milan, Italy
2Studi Cognitivi, Cognitive Psychotherapy School and Research Center, Foro Buonaparte 57, 20121 Milan, Italy
3Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
4Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
5Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
6Cognitive Neuroscience Group, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany
7Institut für Neurowissenschaften und Medizin, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52428 Jülich, Germany

Received 6 November 2012; Accepted 25 November 2012

Academic Editors: G. de Courten-Myers and F. G. Wouterlood

Copyright © 2012 Linda Confalonieri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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