Table of Contents
ISRN Oncology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 616310, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/616310
Review Article

Development of Safer Gene Delivery Systems to Minimize the Risk of Insertional Mutagenesis-Related Malignancies: A Critical Issue for the Field of Gene Therapy

Department of Biology, College of Science and Technology, Temple University, Bio-Life Science Building, Suite 456, 1900 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA

Received 29 August 2012; Accepted 23 October 2012

Academic Editors: A. Goussia, T. Otto, and Z. Suo

Copyright © 2012 Gaetano Romano. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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