Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 618257, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/618257
Research Article

Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity Creates a “Brown Tide” in Root Phenology and Nutrition

1Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 751 General Services Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2H1
2Grizzly Bear Program, Foothills Research Institute, 1176 Switzer Drive, Hinton, AB, Canada T7V 1X6

Received 13 April 2012; Accepted 26 May 2012

Academic Editors: R. B. Boone and P. Ferrandis

Copyright © 2012 Sean C. P. Coogan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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