Table of Contents
ISRN Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 628797, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/628797
Review Article

Use of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes in Baculovirus Research and Recombinant Protein Expression: Current Trends and Future Perspectives

1Department of Pathogen Molecular Biology, Faculty of Infectious Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
2Centre for Emerging Endemic and Exotic Diseases, Department of Pathology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield AL9 7TA, UK

Received 20 July 2012; Accepted 16 August 2012

Academic Editors: M. Feiss, P. D. Ghiringhelli, and T. Krishnan

Copyright © 2012 Polly Roy and Rob Noad. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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