Table of Contents
ISRN Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 681469, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/681469
Review Article

Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Department of Oral Biology and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand

Received 13 December 2011; Accepted 17 January 2012

Academic Editors: H.-W. Lo, D. M. Ramos, and D. Tong

Copyright © 2012 Suttichai Krisanaprakornkit and Anak Iamaroon. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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