Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 692517, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/692517
Research Article

Stealth Effect of Red Shell in Laqueus rubellus (Brachiopoda, Terebratulida) on the Sea Bottom: An Evolutionary Insight into the Prey-Predator Interaction

1Department of Geology, National Museum of Nature and Science, 4-1-1 Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005, Japan
2Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan

Received 9 November 2011; Accepted 19 December 2011

Academic Editors: A. Arslan, S. Fattorini, and M. Klautau

Copyright © 2012 Yuta Shiino and Kota Kitazawa. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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