Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2012, Article ID 729307, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/729307
Research Article

Vocal Communication in Androgynous Territorial Defense by Migratory Birds

1Hemlock Hill Field Station, 22318 Teepleville Flats Road., Cambridge Springs, PA 16403, USA
2Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3

Received 2 November 2011; Accepted 4 December 2011

Academic Editors: T. Monnin and V. Tilgar

Copyright © 2012 Eugene S. Morton and Bridget J. M. Stutchbury. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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