Table of Contents
ISRN Cardiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 743813, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/743813
Review Article

Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 24 September 2012; Accepted 14 October 2012

Academic Editors: F. Boucher and D. Leung

Copyright © 2012 Karina W. Davidson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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