Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 769412, 28 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/769412
Review Article

Polarization and Myelination in Myelinating Glia

Department of Medical Science, Teikyo University of Science, 2-2-1 Senju-Sakuragi, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-0045, Japan

Received 3 September 2012; Accepted 13 November 2012

Academic Editors: J. E. Riggs and J. M. Schröder

Copyright © 2012 Toshihiro Masaki. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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