Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 786872, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/786872
Review Article

What Is the Nature of Poststroke Language Recovery and Reorganization?

1Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Sargent College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
2Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Received 9 October 2012; Accepted 5 November 2012

Academic Editors: A. Conti, P. Giannakopoulos, D. Mathieu, and F. G. Wouterlood

Copyright © 2012 Swathi Kiran. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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