Table of Contents
ISRN Rehabilitation
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 823180, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/823180
Research Article

Feasibility and Validity of a Wearable GPS Device for Measuring Outings after Stroke

1Discipline of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Cumberland Campus, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Australia
2Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Cumberland Campus, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Australia
3Department of Health Professions, Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University, 75 Talavera Rd, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia

Received 31 July 2012; Accepted 9 September 2012

Academic Editors: R. Schwarzer and M. Syczewska

Copyright © 2012 Annie McCluskey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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