Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2012, Article ID 846136, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/846136
Research Article

Interspecific Variation in Temperature Effects on Embryonic Metabolism and Development in Turtles

1Department of Zoology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
2Department of Biology, Missouri State University, 901 South National, Springfield, MO 65897, USA

Received 22 November 2011; Accepted 25 December 2011

Academic Editors: P. V. Lindeman and P. Scaps

Copyright © 2012 Day B. Ligon and Matthew B. Lovern. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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