Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 916914, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/916914
Review Article

Genesis of Preeclampsia: An Epidemiological Approach

1Scientific Research Institute, Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango, Avenida Universidad y Volantín no Number, 34000 Durango, DGO, Mexico
2Department of Family Medicine, University Hospital Dr. José Eleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, 64460 Monterrey, NL, Mexico

Received 8 October 2011; Accepted 13 November 2011

Academic Editor: A. Canellada

Copyright © 2012 Jaime Salvador-Moysén et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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