Table of Contents
ISRN Psychiatry
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 947149, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/947149
Research Article

T-817MA, but Not Haloperidol and Risperidone, Restores Parvalbumin-Positive γ-Aminobutyric Acid Neurons in the Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus of Rats Transiently Exposed to MK-801 at the Neonatal Period

1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194, Japan
2Division of Molecular and Clinical Neurobiology, Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, Nußbaumstraße 7, 80336 Munich, Germany

Received 16 May 2012; Accepted 7 June 2012

Academic Editors: A. Deveci and B. A. Ola

Copyright © 2012 Takashi Uehara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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