Table of Contents
ISRN Pulmonology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 973203, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/973203
Clinical Study

Implication of DNA Methylation Profiling in Oral Epithelium for Lung Cancer Screening

1Department of Surgical Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553, Japan
2Institute for Clinical Research, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center and Chugoku Cancer Center, Kure 737-0023, Japan
3Department of Respiratory Surgery, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center and Chugoku Cancer Center, Kure 737-0023, Japan
4Department of Surgery, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center and Chugoku Cancer Center, Hiroshima 737-0023, Japan
5Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center and Chugoku Cancer Center, Kure 737-0023, Japan
6Department of Surgery, Hitoyoshi General Hospital, Hitoyoshi 868-0053, Japan
7Programs for Biomedical Research, Division of Frontier Medical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553, Japan

Received 15 October 2012; Accepted 30 October 2012

Academic Editors: B. Antus, A. Celi, C. Flores, and J. Ho

Copyright © 2012 Hiroaki Harada et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In lung cancer, the roles of molecular alterations in blood, sputum, bronchial brushing, and exhaled gas samples, which are relatively easy to obtain, have been evaluated for clinical availability. This study was based on the hypothesis that similar molecular alterations occur in the lung and oral cavity because both are exposed to the same environmental or tobacco-derived carcinogens. Because epigenetic alterations due to exposure to carcinogens are thought to play a major role in the development of lung cancer, the DNA methylation status of 11 genes in the oral epithelium was analyzed in lung cancer patients ( ) and control individuals without lung cancer ( ). DNA methylation profiling revealed that GDNF, RARB, and HS3ST2 were methylated more frequently in cancer patients than in the control participants ( , 0.0062, and 0.0193, resp.). Combined analysesindicatedthat 6 of 16 cancer patients (37.5%), but only 1 of 32 control individuals (3.1%) showed DNA methylation in 2-3 of these 3 genes ( ). These combined analyses showed the high specificity and positive predictive value in total and subgroup analyses. Our data suggest that DNA methylation profiling using oral epithelium may help in the identification of individuals with a high risk of lung cancer.