Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 137509, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/137509
Research Article

Expression of the H19 Oncofetal Gene in Premalignant Lesions of Cervical Cancer: A Potential Targeting Approach for Development of Nonsurgical Treatment of High-Risk Lesions

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University, Avenue M-700, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 2M9
2Department of Urology, The Hadassah Ein-Kerem Medical Center, The Hebrew University, 91120 Jerusalem, Israel
3Department of Pathology, The Hadassah Ein-Kerem Medical Center, The Hebrew University, 91120 Jerusalem, Israel
4Department of Biological Chemistry, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, 91904 Jerusalem, Israel
5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Hadassah Ein-Kerem Medical Center, The Hebrew University, 91120 Jerusalem, Israel

Received 29 May 2013; Accepted 13 June 2013

Academic Editors: H. Lashen, C. J. Petry, and L. B. Twiggs

Copyright © 2013 Tomer Feigenberg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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