Table of Contents
ISRN Anatomy
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 154625, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/154625
Research Article

Anatomical Variations of Lumbar Arteries and Their Clinical Implications: A Cadaveric Study

1Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, 0094 11 Ragama, Sri Lanka
2Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, 0094 11 Ragama, Sri Lanka

Received 9 July 2013; Accepted 15 August 2013

Academic Editors: B. Doyle and M. Nakamura

Copyright © 2013 Aranjan Lionel Karunanayake and Arunasalam Pathmeswaran. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Lumbar arteries arise from the abdominal aorta. Some abdominal and spinal surgeries can damage these arteries, and that can lead to serious consequences. This study aimed at studying the types and frequencies of variations of lumbar vasculature. We dissected both sides of 109 adult human cadavers and studied the variations of lumbar vasculature. Age range was 43–90 years. Fifty-seven percent were males and 43% were females. The number of lumbar arteries arising from either side of the abdominal aorta varied between 3 and 5 pairs. The lumbar arteries arose from a common single stem in 12% of the cadavers. The third and fourth pairs of lumbar arteries arose from a common single stem in 3% and 11% of cadavers, respectively, and the first and second pairs of lumbar arteries arose from a common single stem in 1% and 2% of cadavers, respectively. The first and second lumbar arteries on the right side traveled anterior to the right crus of the diaphragm in 7% and 8% of cadavers, respectively. There were several variations with regard to the number, origin from the abdominal aorta, and pathway of lumbar arteries from what is described in the literature.