Table of Contents
ISRN Hypertension
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 165937, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/165937
Review Article

Hypertension: The Neglected Complication of Transplantation

Hypertension Section, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Juan D. Perón 4190, C1181ACH Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 10 March 2013; Accepted 11 April 2013

Academic Editors: A. A. Noorbala, R. S. Padwal, and D. G. Romero

Copyright © 2013 Lucas S. Aparicio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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