Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2013, Article ID 167059, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/167059
Review Article

Rise of Clinical Trials Industry in India: An Analysis

Centre for Social Medicine and Community Health, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India

Received 10 April 2013; Accepted 19 May 2013

Academic Editors: S. M. Pezzotto, M. San Sebastian, and E. J. Simoes

Copyright © 2013 Vikas Bajpai. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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