Table of Contents
ISRN Neuroscience
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 179272, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/179272
Review Article

Nonsocial Functions of Hypothalamic Oxytocin

1Department of Pediatrics, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001, China
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001, China
3Medical Imaging and Diagnostics, Mudanjiang Medical University, Mudanjiang, Heilongjiang 157011, China
4Louisiana State University Medical School, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71103-4228, USA

Received 29 March 2013; Accepted 23 April 2013

Academic Editors: J. A. Anselmo-Franci and O. J. Bosch

Copyright © 2013 Hai-Peng Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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