Table of Contents
ISRN Physiology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 186365, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/186365
Review Article

High Density Lipoprotein: Assembly, Structure, Cargo, and Functions

Haematopoiesis and Leukocyte Biology, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia

Received 21 October 2013; Accepted 28 November 2013

Academic Editors: X.-P. Chu, G. Cui, F. Moccia, and S. Trapp

Copyright © 2013 Andrew J. Murphy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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