Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 230261, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/230261
Research Article

Effects of Propofol, a Sedative-Hypnotic Drug, on the Lipid Profile, Antioxidant Indices, and Cardiovascular Marker Enzymes in Wistar Rats

1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, 1 University Road, Oyo-Ojoo Way, Ibadan 20005, Nigeria
2Department of Anaesthesia, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria

Received 26 April 2013; Accepted 24 May 2013

Academic Editors: G. M. Campo, S. Cuzzocrea, and J. C. Laguna

Copyright © 2013 Oluwatosin A. Adaramoye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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