Table of Contents
ISRN Rehabilitation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 232978, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/232978
Clinical Study

The Influence of Self-Efficacy on Mood States in People with Spinal Cord Injury

1Rehabilitation Studies Unit, Sydney Medical School-Northern, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 6, Ryde, Sydney, NSW 1680, Australia
2Key University Centre for Health Technologies, University of Technology, Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia

Received 18 January 2013; Accepted 17 February 2013

Academic Editors: P. Czarnecki, J. D. Kingsley, J. J. Sosnoff, and M. Yu

Copyright © 2013 Ashley Craig et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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