Table of Contents
ISRN Hypertension
Volume 2013, Article ID 234034, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/234034
Review Article

The Influence of Arsenic, Lead, and Mercury on the Development of Cardiovascular Diseases

Clinical Metal Toxicologist (IBCMT), Marienstraße 1, 97070 Wuerzburg, Germany

Received 14 October 2012; Accepted 20 November 2012

Academic Editors: A. Pihlanto and H. Teragawa

Copyright © 2013 Peter Jennrich. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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