Table of Contents
ISRN Hepatology
Volume 2013, Article ID 237870, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/237870
Review Article

Murine Models of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis

Division of Gastroenterology, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808574, Japan

Received 30 October 2012; Accepted 22 November 2012

Academic Editors: A. M. Concejero, C. Domenicotti, and B. Radosevic-Stasic

Copyright © 2013 Masashi Ninomiya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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