Table of Contents
ISRN Neuroscience
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 253210, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/253210
Research Article

The Role of Neurotransmitters in Protection against Amyloid-β Toxicity by KiSS-1 Overexpression in SH-SY5Y Neurons

1Department of Human and Health Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 6UW, UK
2Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Roehampton, Holybourne Avenue, London SW15 4JD, UK

Received 17 May 2013; Accepted 19 June 2013

Academic Editors: S. V. Meethal and W. Portillo

Copyright © 2013 Amrutha Chilumuri and Nathaniel G. N. Milton. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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